ILD Life Expectancy

Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD) is a progressive condition that develops in the lungs making it very difficult to breathe or perform any physical activity. As the disease worsens, the abilities of the individually suffering from its symptoms are greatly reduced. Simple tasks like walking to the mailbox or taking a shower take an excessively long amount of time and energy or can not be completed at all. As many as 12 million people in America suffer from chronic lung disease and the disease is also the fourth leading cause of death according to Healthline.

About ILD

Interstitial lung disease is an umbrella term used to categorize over 100 different types of pulmonary disorders that affect absorption of oxygen into the lungs. It includes a diverse collection of illnesses with a variety of causes, treatments and prognoses. Individuals who suffer from interstitial lung disease often have difficulty breathing and moving from place to place due to a consistent feeling of shortness of breath. Disorders classified under interstitial lung disease are often characterized by scarring of the lung’s delicate tissues, and a subsequent dry, pestering cough.

ILD Life Expectancy

Unfortunately, due to the progressive nature of ILD and the fact there is not a known cure, getting diagnosed with ILD can be life sentence. There are plenty of things you can do to help slow or even stop the progression of ILD like exercise, dieting, prescription drugs and cellular therapy. Even with all of the factors that are known about the disease, there isn’t a current model to predict life expectancy for those who develop the condition.

Treating Advanced ILD

Cellular therapy for lung disease has been a growing treatment option over the past few years. At the Lung Institute, a progressive cellular therapy clinic that has emerged as a leader in the global stem cell community, they use cells from the patient’s own body to treat lung disease. The cells are called autologous cells. These cells are taken intravenously from the patient’s blood (venous cells) or bone marrow. The cells are then cultured and multiplied and returned to the body through an intravenous drip. The new healthy cells are attracted to the areas of the damaged lung cells and get to work promoting the healing of lung tissue. This results is the ability of the patients to breathe easier and inevitably get their life back.

A progressive lung disease often leads to a patient needing to take their treatment into their own hands through researching various options that may seem non-traditional. Most patients are not ready to simply give up on their health, and unfortunately the prognosis that comes along with lung disease can seem like it’s the only option.

If you or a loved one has emphysema, cellular therapy may be right for you. Contact the Lung Institute for a free consultation or call (800) 729-3065.

* Every patient is given a Patient Satisfaction Survey shortly after treatment. Responses to the 11-question survey are aggregated to determine patient satisfaction with the delivery of treatment.

^ Quality of Life Survey data measured the patient’s self-assessed quality of life and measurable quality of improvement at three months.

All claims made regarding the efficacy of Lung Institute's treatments as they pertain to pulmonary conditions are based solely on anecdotal support collected by Lung Institute. Individual conditions, treatment and outcomes may vary and are not necessarily indicative of future results. Testimonial participation is voluntary. Lung Institute does not pay for or script patient testimonials.

As required by Texas state law, the Lung Institute Dallas Clinic has received Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval from MaGil IRB, now Chesapeake IRB, which is fully accredited by the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Program (AAHRPP), for research protocols and procedures. The Lung Institute has implemented these IRB approved standards at all of its clinics nationwide. Approval indicates that we follow rigorous standards for ethics, quality, and protections for human research.

Each patient is different. Results may vary.