Exhale

The official blog of the Lung Institute.

Great American Smokeout

19 Nov 2015
| Under Lung Disease, Smoking | Posted by | 0 Comments
Great American Smokeout

Thinking out quitting but finding the first step to be the hardest?

Today is the Day to Make the First Step

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is the most prevalent form of chronic lung disease affecting over 329 million people worldwide. For many of those suffering from the disease, the direct cause can be attributed to years of direct smoking, second-hand smoke, and air pollutants from poor working conditions or congested urban living conditions.

For many who developed the disease through smoking, quitting has been an extremely challenging task to overcome, even after diagnosis. Considered by many former smokers to be one of the hardest things they’ve ever done, smoking can be a hard habit to kick.

However, on the road to better health, all it takes to get started is to put a foot out and take the first step. In honor of the Great American Smokeout, the Lung Institute intends to support anyone wishing to start the journey to being tobacco- free today.

Brief History

Beginning on November 16, 1977, The Great American Smokeout has been an annual event in the U.S. with the goal of encouraging the current population of nearly 44 million Americans to quit smoking for one day with the hopes that the decision will convince them to quit smoking for good. Today smoking is still the largest preventable cause of disease and premature death in the United States.

Why Now?

As we’ve mentioned before, by quitting smoking even for a short amount of time, your body begins to take notice and there is a significant effect on respiratory health. Within twenty minutes of quitting, your heart rate and blood pressure will begin to drop. Within 12 hours of quitting, the carbon monoxide level in your blood drops to normal. Within two weeks to three months, your circulation improves and your lung function increases. In effect, you actively become healthier the longer you abstain from smoking.

Don’t Stop Believin’

Quitting smoking is a difficult endeavor, but it is objectively worth it. Whether fighting to maintain your health for the sake of loved ones or just yourself, by participating in the Great American Smokeout and quitting smoking even for just a day, you’ll be making a step in the right direction towards a healthier and longer life.

If you or a loved one suffers from COPD, or any lung disease, the Lung Institute may be able to help with a variety of treatment options. Contact us at (800) 729-3065 to find out if you qualify for cellular therapy.

Thinking about quitting? Considering taking on the challenge of quitting for a day?  Tell us about your experience! Share your thoughts and comments on the Great American Smokeout below…

* Every patient is given a Patient Satisfaction Survey shortly after treatment. Responses to the 11-question survey are aggregated to determine patient satisfaction with the delivery of treatment.

^ Quality of Life Survey data measured the patient’s self-assessed quality of life and measurable quality of improvement at three months.

All claims made regarding the efficacy of Lung Institute's treatments as they pertain to pulmonary conditions are based solely on anecdotal support collected by Lung Institute. Individual conditions, treatment and outcomes may vary and are not necessarily indicative of future results. Testimonial participation is voluntary. Lung Institute does not pay for or script patient testimonials.

As required by Texas state law, the Lung Institute Dallas Clinic has received Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval from MaGil IRB, now Chesapeake IRB, which is fully accredited by the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Program (AAHRPP), for research protocols and procedures. The Lung Institute has implemented these IRB approved standards at all of its clinics nationwide. Approval indicates that we follow rigorous standards for ethics, quality, and protections for human research.

Each patient is different. Results may vary.