Exhale

The official blog of the Lung Institute.

Beginner Exercises with Lung Disease

16 Jul 2015
| Under Lifestyle, Lung Disease | Posted by
| 8 Comments
Beginner Exercises with Lung Disease

It seems like everyday we hear that exercise is key to better health, and it’s true. Unfortunately for a lot of us, it feels impossible to begin an exercise regimen. I mean where should we start? As a less-than-expert exerciser, it can be difficult to figure out how to break into the exercise world. Thankfully, the Lung Institute is here to help you figure out what you should and shouldn’t do when trying some beginner exercises with lung disease.

What Not To Do

  1. Don’t Start Off Too Hard. It’s not healthy to go from zero to hero. If you haven’t been to the gym in years, your first step should not be to go lifting heavy weights and running miles. Overdoing it can have multiple detrimental effects. From injury to excess soreness to simply avoiding the gym altogether, pushing yourself too far too fast will keep you from continuing on your path to better health.
  2. Don’t Start without Your Doctor. The first and most important thing you can do, before starting any exercise regimen, is talk to your doctor. She or he will be able to help you figure out the best exercise program for you. Depending on your current condition and medical history, there may be certain exercises that will benefit you and your lungs the most. Your doctor will also be able to tell you if there are any medication interactions you should watch out for.
  3. Don’t Give Up. Figuring out the right exercise regimen is hard at any skill level. When you are just starting out, it is important to take it slow and try a few different things. You never know what type of exercise you will fall in love with.

Beginner Exercises with Lung Disease

Yoga for Lung Disease

Yoga is a great type of exercise for sufferers of lung disease because there are actual yoga classes dedicated to individuals with difficulty breathing. As a result of the huge focus on breathing throughout a yoga class, you can actually feel your breathing improve as you exercise your lungs.

Walking with Lung Disease

Walking is an excellent way to break into physical activity. For those suffering from a lung disease, joining an indoor walking program can help you ease back into working out. Across America, malls and shopping centers host morning walking groups to promote supporting each other and keeping healthy.

Gardening with Lung Disease

Gardening is the new go-to exercise for individuals both young and old. Getting outside in the garden is a great way to stay fit and enjoy the outdoors this summer. Additionally, as most of you already know, gardening can be therapeutic, good for the mind and body.

Being healthy doesn’t happen overnight, and it takes a lot of dedication, but most importantly, it is possible! No matter what your current condition is, it is possible to get back to the life you want. Exercise is just the beginning; many chronic lung disease sufferers are seeking out alternative treatment options like cellular therapy to get back to breathing easier. To find out if cellular therapy is right for you, contact us at (800) 729-3065.

* Every patient is given a Patient Satisfaction Survey shortly after treatment. Responses to the 11-question survey are aggregated to determine patient satisfaction with the delivery of treatment.

^ Quality of Life Survey data measured the patient’s self-assessed quality of life and measurable quality of improvement at three months of COPD patients.

All claims made regarding the efficacy of Lung Institute's treatments as they pertain to pulmonary conditions are based solely on anecdotal support collected by Lung Institute. Individual conditions, treatment and outcomes may vary and are not necessarily indicative of future results. Testimonial participation is voluntary. Lung Institute does not pay for or script patient testimonials.

As required by Texas state law, the Lung Institute Dallas Clinic has received Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval from MaGil IRB, now Chesapeake IRB, which is fully accredited by the Association for the Accreditation of Human Research Protection Program (AAHRPP), for research protocols and procedures. The Lung Institute has implemented these IRB approved standards at all of its clinics nationwide. Approval indicates that we follow rigorous standards for ethics, quality, and protections for human research.

Each patient is different. Results may vary.